Lost in the Weeds, A Perspective on Revisions

RevisionsI’ve admitted before that I’m an editing whore.  I get stuck in an endless round of edits and never get to that “Final” version of my WIP.  Currently, I’m stuck in Revisions Hell.

I got 13,000 words into my WIP and didn’t like the way it was headed.  I tried some minor character and plot revisions with no avail.  So, major revisions here I come.

This unfortunately means I will lose pretty much all those 13,000 words (nearly 6 chapters).  I have learned in the past that, unfortunately, when I do revisions of this magnitude, trying to cling to the original draft of the manuscript ends in a horrible mess with continuity errors, etc.  It’s better to start fresh.

So, here’s me starting over.  I am however much, much happier with the direction of my revised characters and plot.  Hopefully that will stick past 13,000 words this time.

Cheers and kisses,

Heather

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The Up-Down Plotting Method

As writers, most of us are familiar with those plotting charts that look like a rollercoaster.  imagesCAO4872C

A good plot takes the characters and the reader on a ride of highs and lows, failures and triumphs, ntil the ultimate pinnacle of the climax.

I’ve been working on roughing out my plot for my Work in Progress.  I’m not a big fan of massive plotting with intricate details written down.  I like those little details to evolve organically as  I write.  I enjoy a more spontaneous creative process where my characters and their lives come “alive” as I write.  I’m a dedicated pantser.

But even the most dedicated pantser can get lost in the wood while writing if we don’t have a direction to point our plot in.  Thus I have developed what I call the Up-Down Plotting MethodContinue reading

Story Planning: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

Plot outline - visualI’d been writing for years before I heard of the terms “plotter” and “pantser” (aka pantster).  A plotter is a writer who (duh!) plots out every little detail of their book before they ever pen the first line.  Fantasy and sci fi writers in particular are notorious for spending months and even years plotting out their complex alternate worlds.  Pantsers write “by the seat of their pants”.  They take a story idea and dive in head first, without major pre-plotting. Continue reading